Our study of the effects of New Hampshire’s current education funding system suggests the system is an abject failure that has not improved the relative situation of poorer towns and may be making things worse. Poorer towns have not made progress relative to wealthier towns on education spending and are losing significant ground on tax rates.

This report will enlighten people curious why charter schools did not emerge immediately after
New Hampshire’s charter school law was passed in 1995. It will provide helpful ideas for
New Hampshire legislators seeking to improve New Hampshire’s charter school law and
guidance to those who want to pursue a charter school here.

As the New Hampshire Legislature continues its struggle with the school funding issue, the debate still seems to shed more heat than light. Some of the apparent confusion derives from faulty logic, some from loose terminology used for key concepts….

This article, based on historic New Hampshire documents, shows common features between public free academy charters in the late 18th to early 19th century and today’s charter public school model.